• Issue

    Area: Volume 56, Issue 1

    March 2024

ISSUE INFORMATION

Free Access

Issue Information

  • First Published: 12 February 2024

SPECIAL SECTION - QUALITATIVE LONGITUDINAL METHODOLOGIES

Open Access

Qualitative longitudinal methodologies for crisis times: Against crisis exceptionalism and ‘helicopter’ research

  • First Published: 01 February 2024
Short Abstract

There are two main contributions of qualitative longitudinal methodologies (QLMs) as told through the eight papers in the Special Section: first that QLMs guard against crisis exceptionalism, and second that they can mitigate against ‘helicopter’ research.

Open Access

Doing feminist longitudinal research across the COVID-19 crisis: Unheard impacts on researchers and garment workers in Cambodia

  • First Published: 13 June 2023
Description unavailable
Short Abstract

This paper is based on the ReFashion study which used mixed-method longitudinal research to track and amplify the experiences and coping mechanisms of 200 women garment workers in Cambodia as they navigated the financial repercussions of the COVID-19 pandemic. It develops the idea and practice of ‘feminist longitudinal research’ (FLR) through re-centring the too often marginalised knowledges and ways of knowing of Cambodian researchers and research participants. The paper advocates for geographers and other social scientists to go beyond technically-framed issues of participant ‘attrition’ and ‘retention’ in longitudinal studies to think more creatively and critically about the process of longitudinal research and what it means for those taking part in it.

Open Access

Fast, slow, ongoing: Female academics' experiences of time and change during COVID-19

  • First Published: 28 July 2023
Short Abstract

This paper reports on an investigation using a diary, diary-interview method (DDIM) into female academics' experiences of living and working through the COVID-19 pandemic in the United Kingdom (UK). The paper argues that DDIM has the capacity to convey temporal disruption and complexity, aligned with notions of crisis as fast, slow and ongoing. Nixon's theorising of ‘slow violence’ is used to frame a consideration of the pandemic's longer-term, negative implications for female academics' career progression.

‘Like every other day’: Writing temporalities of banal exploitation among precarious migrant workers

  • First Published: 01 August 2023
Description unavailable
Short Abstract

This paper explores the violence of extended waiting by destitute migrant workers in Singapore in the context of claim-making. The discussion aims to contribute to geographical literature on migrant time-spaces through the introduction of a participatory storytelling methodology for illuminating the slow and banal violence of extending waiting.

Open Access

‘I guess I really survived many crises’: On the benefits of longitudinal ethnographic research

  • First Published: 13 June 2023
Short Abstract

The paper presents two main benefits of longitudinal ethnographic research. First, it allows to capture how crisis, for some people, is not just a moment or phase but acts as context generating a recurring experience of an ‘uncanny present’. Second, it supports participants' self-awareness around their ability to navigate the unknown, this demonstrating the ethical care dimension of the research.

Open Access

Crisis temporalities and ongoing capabilities in the lives of young people growing up on the streets of African cities: An ethnographic longitudinal perspective

  • First Published: 16 July 2023
Description unavailable
Short Abstract

This paper explores the crisis temporalities of young people's street lives in African cities through a youth-led ethnographic longitudinal approach. The paper discusses the challenges of undertaking longitudinal research alongside the temporal affordances of surviving urban informality and the compounding effects of slow crises on present and future-oriented survival. The paper concludes by demonstrating the crucial importance of ethnographic longitudinal research for policy and practice to ensure that youth who age on the streets, and their families, are supported in accordance with social justice concerns.

Open Access

Oral Histories and Futures: Researching crises across the life-course and the life-course of crises

  • First Published: 07 October 2023
Short Abstract

This paper presents new possibilities for qualitative methodologies to embrace the multi-directional and longitudinal temporalities of crises across the life-course and the life-course of crises. I outline five areas of innovation—and associated observations, opportunities and obstacles—including a focus on younger generations, on the future, the inclusion of reflexive activities, interviewing in the midst of crises, and remote interviewing.

Longitudinal reflections on the slow and fast crisis of domestic violence during COVID-19

  • First Published: 07 October 2022
Short Abstract

This paper draws on a four-year qualitative study that examines changes to legal processes related to the response to domestic violence in Seattle that began before and continued through the COVID-19 pandemic, to examine a series of crisis temporalities that were exacerbated by the pandemic and associated lockdowns. In reflecting on the crisis temporalities that mark this research project, I underscore how such crises can also create conditions that lead to long overdue social change. This paper thus highlights the ‘temporal affordances’ of longitudinal research that enable analysis to better understand the factors that motivate transition over time, particularly those in traditional institutions like the legal system.

Open Access

Neighbourhood regeneration through a longitudinal lens: Exploring crisis temporalities in Bristol, UK

  • First Published: 27 July 2023
Description unavailable
Short Abstract

This paper examines the impact of the New Deal for Communities programme on four neighbourhoods in Bristol, UK, using a longitudinal qualitative approach. Building from community perspectives on continuity and change, it examines how this urban regeneration programme altered the neighbourhoods and its lasting effects beyond the funding period. The paper additionally reflects on the impact of the coronavirus emergency and austerity measures on these neighbourhoods. As regeneration is portrayed as a dynamic and vulnerable process that does not follow a predetermined or linear trajectory, the significance of moving beyond singular, snapshot enquiries to comprehensively address this aspect is emphasised.

ARTICLES

Open Access

Emancipatory archival methods: Exploring the historical geographies of disability

  • First Published: 22 October 2022
Short Abstract

The paper uses a case study of Le Court Cheshire Home to explore research ethics and the applicability of emancipatory research principles for an archival study of disability.

Open Access

‘Fixing’ destitute children: The relational geography of an early twentieth century children's home through its archives

  • First Published: 12 June 2023
Description unavailable
Short Abstract

Drawing from early twentieth century documents from the Home for Destitute Children in Burlington, Vermont, USA, I take a ‘geographical relational poverty’ approach to gain insights by examining power relations between middle-class adult women and ‘destitute’ children. Specifically, I use records generated by women in charge of the Home (the matrons and the Board of Directors) to identify its relational relevance, exploring the Home as a material place, the discursive construction of children needing ‘fixing’, and a reflection on archives as providing ‘reparative recognition’.

Open Access

Loitering with (research) intent: Remote ethnographies in the immigration tribunal

  • First Published: 24 August 2023
Short Abstract

Court ethnographies have commonly relied on the physical presence of the ethnographers. This paper explores the opportunities and the challenges of conducting court ethnographies without this physical presence. Specifically, it examines what it means to conduct remote ethnographies of legal processes where neither the ethnographer nor the other hearing participants are physically co-present.

Open Access

The spatial development of peripheralisation: The case of smart city projects in Romania

  • First Published: 30 September 2023
Description unavailable
Short Abstract

By using a comparative and developmental quantitative methodology for the urban smart projects of Romania and taking the city of Timişoara as a case study, this study highlights the fact that large cities are not always the best represented; our findings show that peripheral small cities and towns may enjoy a more balanced distribution of smart projects. Furthermore, our evaluation of the spatial distribution (centre–periphery) of smart city projects in Timişoara—a European Capital of Culture in 2023—reveals a higher level of investment in smart projects in its urban periphery. By presenting new critical understandings of the spatial interrelationships of smart city development, the study contributes to the geography of smart cities.

COMMENTARY

Open Access

Care and the academy: Navigating fieldwork, funding and care responsibilities

  • First Published: 12 October 2023
Description unavailable
Short Abstract

This commentary reflects on a small project jointly conducted by the Development Geographies Research Group (DevGRG) and the Gender and Feminist Geographies Research Group (GFGRG) of the RGS-IBG, which aimed to understand the challenges faced by UK-based academics with care responsibilities (including but not limited to childcare). In this agenda-setting piece, we focus on research funding policies and practices around fieldwork, highlighting the specific effects of funding on the careers of people with caring responsibilities in Geography – a field-based subject.